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31.5.17

SEMESTER II, ANSWERS TO WEEK I


NOT BLACK
After him, 
Not-Black was chief, 
who was a straight man.
MUCH-LOVED
After him, 
Much-Loved was chief, 
a good man.
NO-BLOOD
After him, 
No-Blood was chief, 
who walked in cleanliness.
SNOW-FATHER
 After him, 
Snow-Father was chief, 
he of the big teeth.
TALLY MAKER
After him, 
Tally-Maker was chief, 
who made records.
SHIVERER-WITH-COLD
 After him, 
Shiverer-with-Cold was chief,
 who went south
to the corn land

SEMESTER II, WEEK 1, PART 3, TALLY MAKER

1368
TALLY MAKER
After him, 
Tally-Maker was chief,
 who made records.
 Sagimawtenk olumapi,
 leksahowen sohalawak.
__DECIPHERMENT___
Sagima  wtenk
            (Judge after = then)
olum api
        (year person)
leksa            howen
lichi              howen
lie (= put) down  anyone         LENV5O59      HACV7022              soha    la     wak
              seigr  vera  foolk
               tough-like people
SISV4131
___COMMENTS___
A new dicipherment using Sherwin's words does not significantly change the original translation.

 The pictograph represents a record keeper at work.  The original stanza should be used.

Based on the probable location between Sissiton (Buffalo town) and the next recorded location, Minnihaha (little waterfall), the Tally Maker was located somewhere in what is now South Dakota, probably along the BIG SIOUX RIVER.  Today Interstate 29 parallels the BIG SIOUX RIVER as a major travel route.

Many names along the route are LENAPE/NORSE names: Sissiton, Traverse, Wilmot, Milbank, Kampeska, (at Watertown) Norden, Poinsett, Brookings, Minnehaha and others.

Enough LENAPE/NORSE names survive after seven centuries to indicate the probable migration of the Greenland LENAPE.
The paradigm to keep in your heads is that the Greenland LENAPE were a cohesive group of people migrating through a lightly populated land.  The Southern Lenape (Shawnee) people on the land spoke LENAPE but had a nomadic culture. They moved to harvest food. The Shawnee were willing to move out of the way or, maybe, move in with the Greenland LENAPE.
Thousands of people in a cohesive group may have depleted the local food resources over time.  A continual movement of the group at about 20 miles per year may have added new food.  Those LENAPE remaining behind may have survived at did the Shawnee of the nomadic culture.

The LENAPE history was created in the 14th century by historians in the Greenland LENAPE group.  The surrounding people, the Shawnee, had been on the land for over three hundred years.









      


SEMESTER II, WEEK1, PART B NO-BLOOD

1366-1367
NO BLOOD
After him, 
No-Blood was chief, 
who walked in cleanliness.
Sagimawtenk matemik, sagimawtenk pilsohalin.
_ _ _ _ _
Sagima (Judge)
wtenk (then, after)
ma (not)
Temik ? (telling)
_______________
This pictograph and stanza appears to refer to TWO years.  The first phrase "matemik" appears to be "Not telling."  So far "temik" sounds have no relation to blood.
So the original translation might be flawed.  The LENAPE reciter may have said "I cannot tell" (because I do not remember.)  The Monrovian recorders may have somehow recorded "No Blood."
___Second Phrase___

Sagima (Judge)
wtenk (then, after)
pil soha   lin
    pil aoua  len ni

      PETV3103      RENV1168
admirable    PURE
____________
  The second phrase ends with the sound "LIN" which means "Pure."

The first word appears to be "pilaoua." A string of Norse vowels is difficult to spell.
"Pilaoua" means "admirable."

The "head" raised up on a pedestal might be a way to draw "admirable."
___COMMENTS___
The original LENAPE historian in 1366 may have been creating self-verifying stanzas of about 48 syllables.
There is indications that the LENAPE reciter was giving the Moravians, in 1831, the shortest phrase and meaning possible, because he was disturbed by the poor translation he was hearing.
Yet pieces of two out of three stanzas use the "LEN" syllable.
"Keep on (being) pure.
...
Admirably pure."

I think this is a remarkable distillation of the important  things to record for history at a time during the beginning of the Little Ice Age, when food for all was becoming difficult to find.

The words of the LENAPE history appear to make sense when the definitions of VIKING and the RED MAN are used.  That ability to decipher should convince us that the words are Norse.

The LENAPE history has been known for 186 years.
The VIKING and the RED MAN has been published for 76 years.

Yet I have seen no university linguists professor write that the American Language was Norse--or even attempt to explain that the American Language was not Norse.

The suppression of this knowledge is done by omitting the LENAPE history  and the VIKING and the RED MAN from the curriculum.

Finding Norse words in eastern North America is not difficult.  Finding a professor who will teach that Norse words came before the English appears to be almost impossible.

I am looking for an university professor who will teach that the most Americans spoke Norse, when the English invaded.  

Send me the names of those professors.









SEMESTER 2, WEEK I, NOT BLACK & MUCH LOVED

1364
N0T BLACK
After him,

Not-Black was chief,
 who was a straight man.
Wtenk nekama sakimanep tasukamend shakagapipi.
______________________
The Moravian traslation in AD 1831does not seem quite right.

Below is an attempt to under stand the recorded sounds better.

After (Wtenk) "Peaceful"
Not Black (nekama)
was chief judge (sakimanep)
who When, (Ta) 
(Norwegian "da")
suka
The color probably refered to hair color
mend 
sha
kaga
pipi.
To be determined
________________________
Maybe the LENAPE historian was trying to say
"Not Black was the criteria to judge men by, when most people had dark hair.  Those with "not black" hair raised themselfs above others."

This is a first educated attemp.  I would like your insight.


1365
MUCH LOVED

After him,
Much-Loved was chief,
a good man.


Wtenk nekama sakimanep pemaholend wulitowin.